***I’m fasting from social media throughout Advent.

These posts are being automatically fed to Facebook.

If you’d like me to see your comment,

please do so in the comment section of the blog. Blessings!***

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I’ve tried and failed to do Advent in the traditionally accepted way, but I don’t fit well into the box that is tradition and I’m not cut from the cloth that is normal.

God said, “Follow me,” and I obeyed.

behold

This year I wanted to try again. Things in my immediate family are strained and we’re going to be moving soon and I’m not really feeling the joy of the season  so I thought the quiet anticipation of Christ’s coming would be the perfect healing for my anxious heart.  Years of attempts bombard me telling me I can’t succeed, but I’m a stubborn little cuss.  I prayed, asking God what would he have me do.  The answer came as quite a shock to me: Fast. At first I thought it would be a food based fast, but then God made it clear in my prayer time that it would be a social media fast.

For all of Advent.

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Which also happens to be a time when my husband and I will be separated in a way we haven’t been in many, many years.  Things are happening in our lives that are rather odd, even for our strange life.  We’ll be relocated for Phil’s new job, but we won’t find out where until after Christmas.  So this season of anticipation is dual. I’m awaiting the coming of Christ and the coming of a new chapter in our lives.

When I announced my Advent plans on Facebook, some were disappointed I’d be gone. Some didn’t believe I would follow through.  For those who want to keep up with what I’m learning, I prayed about blogging my lessons and received affirmation (so here I am!) Before I signed off the social media outlets, I made sure my blogs posts would feed to Facebook.  Hopefully it works.

Last night, my dear friend, Mair,  announced “An Expressive Arts Advent” and I KNEW I had to participate.

Today’s reading and activity:

The First Sunday of Advent

“Behold, a virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel.” Isaiah 7:14, KJV.

We begin with the ancient arts of divine reading: lectio divina. There are four movements to this practice: reading, meditating, praying, and contemplating. Slowly read the prophesy of Isaiah, giving some attention to the word behold.

A virgin conceives and bears a son. We call him, “God with us.” Behold the miracle of the Incarnation. Christ put on the fragile garment of human flesh; he lived among us, suffered and died, and promised to return. His coming begs the questions, what does this mean to me? How do I behold Him?

As we pray through Advent, each week we will focus on one of four ways that Christ comes into our lives, beginning with His emergence into the world He created with a Word, as a helpless infant. May we watch and wait, and welcome Him with joy, allowing His presence to transform us.
Take whatever art supplies you feel drawn to and write, draw or paint the word Behold. What thoughts come to mind? What colors, shapes or images? Allow them to emerge without judgment. Let the process surprise you. If you are so inclined, post your word.

My Jesus,

So much is happening during the holiday season. I don’t want to miss You while I’m out shopping for gifts, going to parties, or even attending church to celebrate your coming. I marvel at your humility to leave riches so profound in such a simple dwelling, the womb of a mortal woman. Give me the humility during this sacred time to reflect on my life, recognize my duplicity and, like your mother, open the whole of myself to untold glory. Then I can watch and wait for your salvation. Without you I can do nothing, including utter, with a since heart, the words that reflect the longing of the prophets:

“Come, Lord Jesus.”

behold